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Old Mar 20th, 08, 4:40 pm   #1
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Installing toe kick

A couple questions about installing toe kick.

On long runs (over 88"), do you attach them together with a mending plate or similar? I had planned to do this to avoid (or rather hide) the seam.

Do you butt the corners together or do some people go to the trouble of mitering them? Could use use corner braces on the inside to pull them tight against each other? What about caulking, do they just sit against the floor?

Do you want to be able to remove each piece individually? Any downside to connecting them together (other than a pain to snap on and remove, need multiple hands).

Have to get these to kicks on, I'm sick of balls, toys, sippy cups and everything else rolling under there.

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Old Mar 20th, 08, 5:17 pm  
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Re: Installing toe kick

Not sure about the long runs, but I can give you some answers.

You can just butt the ends up to each other. I think mitering might be more trouble than it's worth. THey give you the edge banding to finish off the ends for this reason.

You could try to use corner braces on the inside, but I think it'd be very hard to get it all to snap on together if it were all one piece.

Don't bother caulking it to the floor - it can just sit there.

Kristen

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Old Mar 20th, 08, 5:35 pm  
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Re: Installing toe kick

The traditional way is to do something called (I think) a scarf join...you miter the ends that will meet in opposite directions and then butt them up so the 45s are on top of each other. That gives you a nice thin almost unnoticeable join, as opposed to the darker join you'd see with a 90 degree butt type joint.

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Old Mar 20th, 08, 6:08 pm  
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Re: Installing toe kick

Quote:
Originally Posted by EvaPerconti View Post
The traditional way is to do something called (I think) a scarf join...you miter the ends that will meet in opposite directions and then butt them up so the 45s are on top of each other. That gives you a nice thin almost unnoticeable join, as opposed to the darker join you'd see with a 90 degree butt type joint.
I assume you mean for the long run over 88"? A scarf join makes sense. (Never heard of it, but wikipedia has a nice illustration).

I originally didn't think about mitering the corners, but I swear I saw something on this site about someone mitering the corners at 45 (although I think I agree with kisaacs, might be more trouble than it's worth).


Thanks.

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Old Apr 13th, 13, 3:24 pm  
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Re: Installing toe kick

I realize this is an old post, but I'm going to add a reply since it came up in my search.

A scarf cut was designed for doing trim work with solid wood. Because solid wood will move with relative humidity a butt joint could open up. With a scarf joint if the cut opens up you would still see wood in the joint.

This doesn't really have an application when using Ikea particleboard . The particleboard isn't going to move the way solid wood does. Plus the veneer will look much different than the interior wood even if it did.

With the Ikea toe kicks and filler, it would be much better to do a butt joint with an attached backer behind it to hold the joint together.

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